Dignity in Ulthuan

Dignity in Ulthuan

By Alan Mittag

 

Travel was long.  The procession traveled two weeks by land, followed by three months at sea.  The entire team, minus it’s coach, made the journey.  The Veteran players, Physique, Royalty, and Ecccentric, Funnny, and Fortress.  The newer members, Swift, Arcane, and Ghoul.  Kelowan and Telowan, Tactician, Lithe the Apothecary in training, all sixty guards who spend their lives protecting Grandiose Majesty, as well as the cooking and cleaning staff.  All in all, 143 High Elves, and one lonely human, myself, took Tenacity home.

Coach Sestonn said his goodbyes before we left, and went on to raise his Chaos team, The Seven Deadly Sins, up to pro level.  I spent a short time with them, before Physique invited me to join the procession to bring Tenacity home.  “Few humans have ever set foot on Ulthuan,” he explained.  “But Tenacity would have been honored to have you there.  Where most of us treat you like the village idiot, he always saw you as the lovable, mentally challenged, little brother.  He was always watching out for you.”

I wiped a tear from my eye and accepted the invitation.  “He was always watching out for everybody.”

We reached Ulthuan almost two weeks ago, but the Royal Elven Blood Bowl Aristocracy, the REBBA, decided to give that time for Tenacity’s fans to gather from the reaches of Ulthuan.  And gather they did.  There were over a hundred thousand high elves encamped around the REBBA.  Men, women, and children from every facet of life.  There were even 4 elven princes that arrived, mounted on horses whose heavy barding was clearly designed to mimic dragons.  Though of course, those 4 princes were assigned rooms within the REBBA while all the others were pitching tents in the field.

I was in the only room I was allowed to be alone in.  The rest of the entire continent require an Elf guide. And from the little I have learned of their language, I am certain the words hanging over my door label my room, “The Human Room”.  The room was over flowered, with little pots of potpourri in every corner, and two resting on a ledge over the doorway.  The shower in my room has three different soaps, and they were labelled in my own language.  Use First.  Use Second.  Use Third.  As well as four shampoos following the same pattern.  Ridiculous, but I followed their instructions.  I was the guest here, afterall.

I stood at the window to my room, looking down on the people gathered.  There were so many.  Dozens of children were playing with a Blood Bowl ball in the open field, and their cheerful laughs just barely reached my ears.  I couldn’t make out any word they said, but they were a mix of happy and sad, and that, more than anything, had me feeling a connection to them.

“The ones to the left are pretending to be Dignity.”  It was Eccentric’s voice.  I looked around but didn’t see him. Not unusual.  He was probably in the ceiling.

“You can hear them from all the way down there?”  I said.

“Yup,” He said.

“Who is the other team pretending to be?”

“Nuffle’s Holy Rollers.”  Eccentric said.  “They are trying to mimic The Best Game Ever.”

“The 6 to 5 game?” I asked.

“The Best Game Ever,” Eccentric said.

We were silent as we watched.  Me, at the window.  Eccentric, wherever he was hiding.  We watched one young elf boy throw a long pass into the waiting arms of another.  Touchdown!  I could practically hear them cheering for Dignity as they ran around screaming and laughing.  I couldn’t help but smile.

“Tomorrow that field is going to be full of tears instead of laughs,” I said.

Eccentric didn’t answer.

I waited for a few seconds.  Still no reply.

Maybe he left.  “Are you still there?” I said.

“I’m still here,” Eccentric said.  He sounded sad himself.  I guess my comment reminded him where we were and why.

“Hey Alan,” Eccentric said.

“Yeah?”

“Do you think you can get some water up here?  I’ve been stuck for two days.”

7 comments

  1. Wondering why Gutrad didn’t get an invitation…he would have honored the passing of a Blood Bowl great, with…dignity!

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